Author: Chicago Unheard

The Role of the Media in Education Reporting – from the Eight Black Hands podcast

Our friends at Eight Black Hands podcast takes a serious look at education in the U.S. and how it serves (or doesn’t) the 8 million Black students in the system. Their latest episode takes a deep dive into the role that the media plays in keeping the public informed (or not) about education. Who is centered in the stories the…

Here’s what we’re reading this week: CPS graduation rates, Michele Clark HS, and policing children

These were a few standout pieces on our radar this week.  Chicago narrows racial gaps in 5-year graduation rate, but disparities persist, by Mila Koumpilova in Chalkbeat Chicago. An analysis of graduation rates recently released by CPS seems to show increased graduation rates across the board, with stubborn racial disparities. We’re keeping an eye on how this data shakes out.…

Teachers: Help us inform families about the Emergency Broadband Benefit

Did you know that every household with a child at a Chicago Public School is eligible to receive up to a $50 discount on their internet bill and a one-time discount of $100 on a device? Through the Emergency Broadband Benefit, families can take advantage of this program and receive the support they need to get and stay connected. We’re…

Graphic Description: Illustration displaying three people accessing the internet on laptops and tablets, surrounded by a blue and purple background and floral imagery. The text reads: “Connect your community: The Emergency Broadband Benefit program is offering up $50 ($75 for those living on tribal lands) off your internet bill each month. Visit Get Emergency Broadband dot org to learn more!”

Don’t Leave Chicago Families Unconnected: Why the Emergency Broadband Benefit can Transform Chicago’s Communities and Deserves the Support of Government and Local Organizations

If Chicago is to truly realize its potential in the interconnected world of the 21st century, we must ensure that no child is left unconnected and that no family must choose between putting food on the table, and paying their internet bill.

This School Called DCFS on a Mom and Teacher Because Her Son Was Picked Up 7 Minutes Late

JaNay Dodson, a Chicago Public Schools teacher and mom, was unable to pick up her 10-year-old son Braylin from Inter-American Magnet School in Lakeview earlier this month because she was teaching a class of her own. She called her brother, who left work and got Braylin for her. No harm, no foul—families help each other out of jams, right? Wrong.…

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